Monday, May 29, 2017

Timing the market is not wise:



But if you must try - we use a 26-Week Price Channel on the TSX as replicated by the S&P/TSX60 iShares ETF (XIU). Investors should remain fully invested during a “buy” and then go to a 10 to 15% cash position during a “sell” signal.

A 26-Week Price Channel (6-month) is a best fit for the volatile TSX60 index.

The last signal on the TSX60 was a BUY on May 27, 2016 at 20.82 on the index. On our chart – a weekly on the XIU we have noted the top and bottom price channels. Note also the mid line (dashed) which is an early warning – currently about the same number as the May 26 close on the XIU.

What ever happened to “Sell In May?” – in any event enjoy but your on your own with this call.

By the way - a 30-week Price Channel seems to work better for the S&P500.


Wednesday, May 3, 2017

More on Guns or Butter?



Paul Anthony Samuelson was an American economist, and the first American to win the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. His textbook Economics – ISBN- 0-07-0 092863-0 has become a classic in which he states in a chapter – Central Problems Of Every Economic Society - that a nation has to choose between two options when spending its finite resources. It may buy either guns (invest in defense / military) or butter (invest in production of goods), or a combination of both.

United States president Lyndon B. Johnson used the phrase to catch the attention of the national media while reporting on the state of national defense and the economy. Another use of the phrase was British prime minister, Margaret Thatcher's reference in a 1976 speech that, "The Soviets put guns over butter, but we put almost everything over guns.

Investors who are confused as to the Guns or Butter choice when it comes to investing should talk to their adviser. The stock charted is probably is a better choice

.


Friday, April 7, 2017

Will that be Guns or Butter?



Paul Anthony Samuelson was an American economist, and the first American to win the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. His textbook Economics – ISBN- 0-07-0 092863-0 has become a classic in which he states in a chapter – Central Problems Of Every Economic Society - that a nation has to choose between two options when spending its finite resources. It may buy either guns (invest in defense / military) or butter (invest in production of goods), or a combination of both.

United States president Lyndon B. Johnson used the phrase to catch the attention of the national media while reporting on the state of national defense and the economy. Another use of the phrase was British prime minister, Margaret Thatcher's reference in a 1976 speech that, "The Soviets put guns over butter, but we put almost everything over guns.

Investors who are confused as to the Guns or Butter choice when it comes to investing should talk to their adviser. The consumer sector charted is probably not a good choice.